Merry Meet and Merry Part, and Merry Meet again

Saturday, May 19, 2012

A Lupine Tale

The lupines in my garden are very special to me. In 2005, I gathered seeds from these lupines from my mother's property in Quebec, where she had a little house (called "Chalet Bosquet", or house in the woods). My mom was born and grew up in Quebec, and her family still has property in a little French-Canadian town north of Quebec City. Almost 40 years ago, my mom threw a handful of lupine seeds around the side of her house, and left them alone. All these years later, the lupines have profusely and joyfully taken over a large part of the land around her place. It is a wonderful sight in late spring when the many-colored lupines stand tall, blooming and beaming at everyone. It looks like a fairy village.

So, I gathered some seeds in the autumn when my husband and I were up there, placed them in an envelope and stuck them in the glove compartment of our van. We made the trip back home. Life went on. Four years later, my son now owned the van. He was away at college, and one day he was looking through the glove compartment and found the envelope with the lupine seeds.

Nick brought them home to me and I was so thrilled. Having forgotten about these seeds (and feeling a little badly about forgetting) I immediately made plans to pot them up and see if they would sprout. After spending four years in the van through hot weather and freezing weather, it was anybody's guess if these seeds were still viable.

About ten days after potting them, little sprouts starting popping up. Soon there were taller plantlings. When they were stronger, my brother and I planted these amazing little wonders into our garden. I saved two pots of lupine plants to take down to Virginia to my mom who was living with my oldest brother. He planted them in the garden by his front entrance. When I presented these pots to my mom and brother, I told the story of where they came from. My mother was so happy and touched, and amazed that the lupine seeds had survived. They thrived there, and my mom so enjoyed seeing them whenever she left the house.

Now that my mom is gone, the blooming of these lupines is even more special. There were lots of different colors of lupines; red, pink, yellow, purply-blue and white. The purply-blue ones were my mom's favorite. The only lupines blooming now are the purply-blue ones. You know what? I don't think that is a coincidence.



I took these two photos yesterday. They are beautiful and flourishing. (click on the photos for a closer look)

17 comments:

Aine said...

Oh, what a great story! I know lupines well - we have a LOT of these around my neck of the woods (which is why I didn't plant them in my garden! LOL! It's amazing that the seeds sprouted!

thecottagebythecranelakeolof1 said...

I try and try but Lupines doesn't like my garden especially much and I don't know why! The former owners says the garden was filled with them back in the days.
But I won't give up :-) I'll try again next year :-)

They found 3000 year old lupine seeds in a cave and they started to grow as soon as they planted them :-) Still they won't grow in my garden :-) :-) :-)

Have a great day!
Christer.

Sandy Sandy said...

I love this story and your beautiful lupines, Robin. I believe that . . . we are, we always have been and we always will be. In death our energy changes form, but it does not cease to exist. This is proof that your mother is (and probably always will be) right there with you. :-D

Linda Wildenstein said...

Your story is a lovely rememberance of your Mom. How absolutely lovely the flowers, the story, and the teller.
xoxo BB, Oma Linda

mxtodis123 said...

What a great and loving story about your mom. And, they are so lovely. I've not seen them since I left the country life. I know they are here in the city, just haven't found them.
Mary

Debra She Who Seeks said...

I'm glad to hear that you have Canadian heritage! And I love lupines too, although they won't grow here on the prairies. They prefer coastal areas, apparently, and like saltier soil or something.

Do you know Monty Python's "Dennis Miller the Highwayman" sketch? He steals only lupines from unwary travellers. "Stand and deliver! Now hand over all the lupines you've got. In a bunch! In a bunch!"

mrsduncanmahogany said...

I absolutely love lupines! They are great in a veg garden too, providing nitrogen to the soil. Purple is my favorite color! Beautiful story, beautiful lupines!

Dianna

Jeanne said...

What a wonderful tale! Something that can be passed on to through the ages. Both seeds and tale! :0)
And the Lupine are gorgeous! :0)

Hippy Jersey Devil said...

What a beautiful story and such an amazing way to remember your mother every Spring. My mother always planted Marigolds around the front of the house. I never liked them because they smell funny so I've never planted them. This year, at the nursery I go to every year, I was drawn to the Marigolds and got bright red ones. I put them in a pot in my front garden I see from my kitchen window and think of her every time I see them.

AkasaWolfSong said...

Robin...This sharing is very special. I so believe your Mom is there with you!!

What a lovely way to bring your mom's energy and spirit to your family...all of us 'seed' in one form or another don't we? Now...she is a Star Seed! How cool is that?

Your photo's are breathtaking...

AkasaWolfSong said...

I thought you might like to read this Robin...

Memories are in the seeds
http://insectamonarca.wordpress.com/2012/05/20/memories-are-in-the-seeds/

Wendy S. said...

There's something really magickal and faery like about Lupines and the story with your mother makes them even more special. Do Lupines need a lot of sun? Would love to scatter them in my little garden patch.

Robin Larkspur said...

Wendy, lupines enjoy full sun, unless you live in a very warm part of the country. I live in New York state, and zone 4-5, and the lupines are in full sun.

Topper said...

I love lupines, they are special, and these are very special.

Mina said...

Oh Robin, what a beautiful story so full of rich symbolism. Nature has a way of making us remember that when precious things are forgotten for a time, when remembered and nurtured, they still flourish. It's the order of the universe. Have a wonderful week, my sweet friend. Mina

Magic Love Crow said...

Robin, what a beautiful story! What beautiful flowers! I don't think it's a coincidence either ;o) Big Hugs ;o)

Sandi Crawford said...

Those are very pretty flowers! The purpley-blue are my favorite as well, and I agree it is not a coincidence. Wow! I am surprised the seeds were still viable after all that time. Amazing story! Love